Rumer Willis: Don’t be too tough on dad, he can’t hear

 

Bruce Willis’ actress daughter Rumer has defended her dad from critics who have blasted him for appearing awkward in interviews, revealing he probably can’t hear the questions properly.

She insists the Die Hard star doesn’t go out of his way to be less than talkative when promoting movies, but a hearing loss issue means he is always struggling to make out what is being said by interviewers.

Rumer, who is Willis’ eldest daughter with ex-wife Demi Moore, explains, “I think part of the problem is sometimes he can’t hear … because he shot a gun off next to his ear when he was doing Die Hard a long time ago, so he has partial hearing loss in his ears.

“If me and my sisters get together and he’s at a dinner table and we start talking about fashion and things, the poor guy…”

Willis’ daughter also feels her dad has a reputation as an edgy, cool guy to keep up: “I think he just has this vibe where he feels like he’s gotta kinda do a cool man (thing).”

With over 25 years’ experience in hearing healthcare, Hidden Hearing is committed to providing the most professional hearing healthcare service to its customers. Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit www.hiddenhearing.ie.

Half of Dubliners exposed to dangerous decibels

DUB Dublin - bus stop in front of Clerys department store on O Connell Street 3008x2000Noise-induced hearing loss is an increasingly prevalent disorder that results from exposure to high-intensity sound. According to a recent study by Dublin city’s local authorities more than half of Dublin’s population is exposed to undesirable noise levels.

Although preventable, it can sometimes be difficult to avoid as we are exposed to excessive noise levels doing routine activities on a daily basis. Of the 1.28m people living in Dublin, 56% are affected by noise emanating from heavy road traffic, aircrafts or trains.

The findings are contained in a new mapping action plan which is designed to identify and quieten the capital’s noisiest neighbourhoods. Dublin’s four local authorities are working together on the map, which will take five years to complete.

The number of people exposed to undesirable night-time noise levels above 55 decibels reduced from 94% in 2008 to 22% in 2012, but 1% or 3,700 people still suffer night-time sound levels above 70 decibels.

In the day time, 46,800 Dubliners are exposed to levels above 70 decibels. A further 12,600 put up with noise levels over 75 decibels. This is down from 24,000 in 2008.

The Noise Action Plan will run from December 2013 to November 2018, and includes efforts to address heavy traffic flow in the loudest neighbourhoods.

In 2008, the first noise map of Ireland singled out the M50 as the worst noise polluter in Dublin, exposing nearby residents to a din as loud as a twin-engined jet at take-off.

Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit http://www.hiddenhearing.ie.

Strimmers are worse than motorway traffic

strimmers

Motorway maintenance workers are exposed to various harmful emissions. Surprisingly, motorised hand-held tools such as strimmers and chainsaws, rather than motorway traffic, are responsible for the highest emissions of particulate matter. These are the conclusions of a study supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF).

The study was conducted between May 2010 and February 2012 by researchers working with Michael Riediker at the Institute for Work and Health in Lausanne. They accompanied 18 maintenance workers on 50 working days during tasks such as clearing snow, mending crash barriers, cleaning drains, cutting wood or mowing grass on the motorway central reservation. They measured the levels of air pollution, particulates and noise to which workers were exposed during each activity. The result: compared to the average population, maintenance workers are exposed to between three and eight times higher particulate levels. In addition, noise levels often exceed the critical level of 85 decibels.

Surprisingly, motorway traffic is not the main source of noise and pollutants. More than 50 percent of airborne particulates are emitted by strimmers and chainsaws. The small combustion engines which the workers carry on their backs use petrol with oil additives. This makes them real belchers,” says Reto Meier, the lead author of the study. The quickest way to reduce particulate levels, therefore, is to improve the engines in these machines. This is primarily a challenge for the manufacturers, but Meier adds that employers can also play a role by considering emission levels when purchasing equipment.

Hearing protection
Maintenance workers are exposed to the highest noise levels when using pneumatic drills. But the use of strimmers or chainsaws and the traffic during maintenance work in tunnels also give rise to noise levels of 90 decibels or more. Researchers noticed that workers wear hearing protection reliably when they are the cause of the noise, but often fail to do so when the noise is caused by their colleagues or by the traffic.

Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit http://www.hiddenhearing.ie.

3 steps to combat hearing loss

carpenter-hearing-loss-thumbnailairport-staffAn estimated 275 million people across the globe can’t hear clearly all the sounds they love. These people suffer from hearing loss, which the World Health Organization lists as the No. 1 sensory disability in the world.

Some people never had their hearing, as they were born deaf, but the majority had something happen along the way that took it from them. Infectious diseases like meningitis, measles, mumps and chronic ear infections, as well as head and ear injuries, and aging all can contribute to hearing loss.

But perhaps the most common cause is excessive noise. Whether it’s a one-time exposure to an intense, “impulse” sound, like gunfire, or by repeated exposure to loud sounds over time, like machinery at work, noise has the potential to rob people of their hearing.

The effects of hearing loss extend well beyond having to turn up the television. It strains a person’s ability to understand conversations, which can cause problems and misunderstandings at work and at home. Hearing loss also leads to isolation from family, friends and the environment.

“The good news is noise-induced hearing loss is preventable,” says Dolores Madden of Hidden Hearing. “So many people could be spared from it, if they just took a few easy steps.”

Step 1: Wear hearing protection

The most important step to preventing hearing loss is to wear hearing protection.

“There are many great hearing protection options, but sometimes it’s a challenge to know which to choose and how and when to wear it correctly,” says Madden. “Hearing protection is now available that is comfortable, fits well, and includes options to enhance communication – like microphones and two-way radio connections for people who need them.”

Step 2: Be mindful around the clock

Sounds louder than 85 decibels (dBA) are more common than people might think. Prolonged exposure to these high-level sounds can permanently damage your hearing, and cause ringing in the ears, along with other symptoms. Most people don’t carry decibel meters, so it’s good to know where those sound levels can occur. Some examples include:

* Attending a football game (100 to 120 dBA)

* Using a leaf blower or chainsaw (95-120 dBA)

* Riding a motorcycle (80-110 dBA)

* Using a lawn mower (82-103 dBA)

* Attending a rock concert (90-120 dBA)

* Listening to a personal music player (75-114 dBA)

* Watching a movie at the theater (72-104 dBA)

Hearing these sounds occasionally, for a limited time, isn’t a major threat to hearing. But repeated exposure to loud sounds can cause hearing damage over time. Many people – like mine workers, police officers, construction workers, farmers and others, work in noise that is 85 dBA or higher every day on the job. As a result, noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common occupational diseases and the second most self-reported occupational illness, according to National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Step 3: Reduce the volume or increase distance

Work-related noise might be unavoidable, but many times, you can be in control of the noise around you. Whenever possible, select quieter vacuums, chain saws, leaf blowers, power tools, etc. Also, be aware that the volume controls on portable entertainment devices can exceed 110 dBA – levels that may be hazardous if you listen for many hours a day. Lower the volume and limit how long you listen to them. If you aren’t able to turn down loud sounds you encounter, take a few steps back from the source of the loud sound. Even a few feet of distance between you and a loud sound can lower the decibel levels that hit you.

Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit www.hiddenhearing.ie.

Sound Advice For Fans Of Ear-Bashing Music

Festival

Summer music festivals great and small are about to be unleashed, but revellers should remember how important it is to protect their ears. In a survey of 2,711 festival-goers in 2008, 84pc said they experienced dullness of hearing or ringing in the ears after listening to loud music.

These are the first signs of hearing damage. The next morning or a couple of days later, your hearing may gradually return to normal, but over time, with continued exposure, there can be permanent damage. The risk of damage to hearing is based on how loud the music is and how long you listen to it for.

If you can’t talk to someone two metres away without shouting, the noise level could be damaging. The dangers to hearing are just as serious at an open-air music festival as they are in an indoor nightclub. Volumes of 137 decibels have been recorded near the stages at some music festivals.

At 140 decibels, which is the same as a jet plane taking off at close range, your ears start hurting. The advice is to wear earplugs for music, stand away from the speakers and take regular breaks from the loudest areas. DJs and musicians have been wearing earplugs for years, and many recommend them to fans. These earplugs are designed specifically for clubs and gigs and don’t muffle sound. There are different types of earplugs available, from the affordable and re-usable one-size-fits-all to custom moulds used by musicians and DJs. Most of them work by reducing the noise level that reaches your ear. This means you can still hear the music the way it is, but at a lower volume.

If you hear tingling or buzzing after listening to a set, give your ears a break. You risk more damage if you don’t.

Wear re-usable earplugs, stand well away from the enormous speakers and spend some downtime at the festival’s chill-out area.

Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit http://www.hiddenhearing.ie

Whitesnake singer talks about his hearing loss

Whitesnake_Coverdale_promoFB_1115-08

Following a recent series of shows in Japan, Whitesnake return to live action this week as they kick off their 2013 UK tour in Belfast.

Making the rounds to promote the trek, singer David Coverdale spoke with the BBC Breakfast team about several things, including his level of hearing loss after more than four decades in rock.

“They’re not bad,” he explains, “they could be a lot worse but I look upon it as a trade-off. I’ve had an incredibly successful journey since joining Deep Purple 40 years ago.”

“There is hearing loss, of course, but we use an in-ear monitor where I can balance the level of the sound,” Coverdale continued. “It’s got to be all-embracing to me, and I work with great musicians, too; they’re not loud to disguise anything..it’s just very powerful stuff.”

In addition to an extensive world tour, Whitesnake will release two live albums this year.

Last month, the band issued “Made In Japan,” a Deluxe 2CD/DVD edition that captures the band in concert at the Loud Park festival on October 15th, 2011 at Saitama Super Arena in Japan during their Forevermore World Tour.

On June 19, Whitesnake will deliver the 2CD set, “Made In Britain/The World Record.” The project includes “Made In Britain,” featuring the best takes of the band’s concerts in Britain in June 2011, and “The World Record,” which contains rare tracks from Whitesnake’s shows in Europe and America on the “Forevermore” tour.

Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit http://www.hiddenhearing.ie.

Doctors report 50% hearing loss among mobile phone users

Blog picWe’ve spoken before about the harmful effects of MP3 players to hearing but doctors in India are now reporting as much as 50% hearing loss among mobile phone users.

 

ENT surgeons have been getting many patients who complain of pain in the ears and even hearing loss.  The most common complaint is that after people hang up the phone their ears gets hot and many patients also complain about tinnitus (ringing in the ears).

 

But the most serious ENT problem is hearing loss.  If a person continues to use the phone excessively, it may turn into a permanent problem.  Hearing loss depends on the decibel level of sound and the duration for which one is exposed.

 

The advice is to decrease the amount of time spent talking on the mobile phone, use a landline instead or text.  Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide.   Freephone 1800 370 000 or http://www.hiddenhearing.ie.