Rumer Willis: Don’t be too tough on dad, he can’t hear

 

Bruce Willis’ actress daughter Rumer has defended her dad from critics who have blasted him for appearing awkward in interviews, revealing he probably can’t hear the questions properly.

She insists the Die Hard star doesn’t go out of his way to be less than talkative when promoting movies, but a hearing loss issue means he is always struggling to make out what is being said by interviewers.

Rumer, who is Willis’ eldest daughter with ex-wife Demi Moore, explains, “I think part of the problem is sometimes he can’t hear … because he shot a gun off next to his ear when he was doing Die Hard a long time ago, so he has partial hearing loss in his ears.

“If me and my sisters get together and he’s at a dinner table and we start talking about fashion and things, the poor guy…”

Willis’ daughter also feels her dad has a reputation as an edgy, cool guy to keep up: “I think he just has this vibe where he feels like he’s gotta kinda do a cool man (thing).”

With over 25 years’ experience in hearing healthcare, Hidden Hearing is committed to providing the most professional hearing healthcare service to its customers. Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit www.hiddenhearing.ie.

When Shingles Leads to Hearing Loss

Hearing-LossShingles is a nervous system disease caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox; it is not a rash or skin infection. The virus can lie dormant in the body’s nerve cells for years in those who’ve had chickenpox; when it reactivates, it spreads down the nerves into the skin.

Hearing loss most often accompanies shingles when the rash forms on the head and face around the ear. About one-third of people who have the shingles rash and blisters near an ear will have a hearing problem due to the infection.  The hearing loss can be temporary, permanent, or even result in deafness.  Typically only one ear is affected.

The two most common conditions that connect hearing loss and shingles are:

 

Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

Ramsay Hunt syndrome occurs when a shingles infection affects the facial nerve near one of your ears.

Symptoms of Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

  • Painful rash on the eardrum, ear canal, earlobe, tongue, roof of the mouth (palate) on the same side as weakness of the face
  • Hearing loss on one side
  • Sensation that you or your surroundings are spinning (vertigo)
  • Weakness on one side of the face
  • Paralysis of one side of the face

Labyrinthitis

Labyrinthitis is an inflammation of the inner ear.  The inner ear houses the organs of balance and hearing.  Shingles can cause labyrinthitis either through direct viral infection or by subsequent bacterial infection that occurs as the blisters begin to heal.

Symptoms of Shingles-Related Hearing Loss

  • Decreased hearing or deafness
  • Intense and severe ear pain
  • Tinnitus (ringing or other strange noises in your ear)
  • Sensation that you or your surroundings are spinning (vertigo)
  • Nausea and/or vomiting

You are more likely to have fewer long-term side effects from shingles if you begin receiving treatment within a few days of your first symptoms. About 70 percent of those with shingles make a full recovery if they’re treated early.

If you delay getting to the doctor, your chances of not suffering any long term side effects falls to about 50 percent. In some cases, the hearing loss will be permanent due to damage to the nerves or to the structures of the inner ear.  If you are experiencing symptoms associated with shingles don’t wait to seek medical attention.

 

 

With over 25 years’ experience in hearing healthcare, Hidden Hearing is committed to providing the most professional hearing healthcare service to its customers. Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit www.hiddenhearing.ie.

 

Reality TV show Big Brother’s first deaf winner celebrates victory

Sam Evans was crowned the champion of Channel 5’s reality TV show Big Brother last night, and celebrated becoming the first winner who has hearing loss.

SamEvansBigBrother2013_largeA UK hearing loss charity has called for the victory to emphasise to businesses and organisations their duty to ensure that they meet the needs of people who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

The production company behind the 10 week television show, Endemol, has described the modifications and changes created through their work with charity Action on Hearing Loss which ensured Sam Evans had a true experience of being a Big Brother housemate.

 

Katherine Hancock, Action on Hearing Loss senior access consultant said: ‘’We worked together with Endemol prior to Sam entering the Big Brother House to ensure that all his access and communication needs were considered and met.

“Changes were then made to the Big Brother House to ensure that Sam had the same equality of access as other housemates, with Endemol taking on our recommendations to ensure that Sam had the same chance of winning.

“We were in constant communication during the course of the show, discussing products and assistive technologies that could benefit Sam and people with hearing loss, while also helping the production company to be accessible to its staff and customers with a hearing loss on a long term basis. We urge organisations to take Endemol’s lead.”

A spokesman from Endemol said: “Sam has been a brilliant housemate and is a deserving winner. Working with the team at Action for Hearing Loss has been a good experience and was invaluable in allowing us to make sure Sam had everything he needed during the his time in the Big Brother House.”

After making Big Brother staff and contestants deaf aware, Action on Hearing Loss is now urging more organisations to mark their commitment to hearing loss by signing up to their Louder than Words charter.

The best practice charter aims to help and celebrate organisations who are striving to offer excellent levels of service and accessibility for customers of employees who are deaf or hard of hearing.

If you’re worried about you or your hearing contact your local Hidden Hearing branch.  Hidden Hearing offers free hearing tests at its 60 branches nationwide. To book a test Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit http://www.hiddenhearing.ie.

For more information visit: http://www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/

 

We have a handy information booklet on how we hear if you are interested apply below and we will send you a FREE copy.howdowehear2

How your mobile phone can cause acne, saggy jaw and hearing problems

Unknown-1Most people admit that they cannot go a day without their mobile phone but now a new study has found that your daily companion could be causing harm to your body.

From ruining your eyes, causing spots and damaging your hearing, the dailymail.co.uk contacted several professionals to investigate the effects that our favourite gadgets have on our bodies.

Damage to eyesight

Dr. Allon Barsam, a consultant ophthalmic surgeon at Luton & Dunstable University Hospital told the website that focusing on your phone screen for hours could lead near-sightedness in the future.

‘Presbyopia, or the inability to focus on close objects, usually develops in your mid-to-late-40s, which is why everyone after a certain age needs reading glasses,’ Barsam said.

‘People only notice this when they can’t read a newspaper, but we tend to hold phones far closer to our eyes than papers — around 10in away as opposed to 16in — so it’s becoming a problem sooner.’

Jawline

The way you hold your phone could also change the definition of your jawline. ‘I’ve seen an increase in the number of women in their 30s concerned about weakness in the lower third of their face,’ cosmetic dermatologist, Dr Sam Bunting was quoted saying.

‘As we age, our skin’s elasticity decreases and it’s feasible that bending our neck forward for hours on end to look at smartphones and tablets may mean there is more of a downwards tug on the delicate skin.’

To avoid this, Bunting advised holding your phone or tablet straight out in front of you, rather than below chest level.

Acne

According to a recent study, our cellphones have more germs on them than the flush handle in a men’s toilet. The constant pressure and contact of the cell phone along with the bacteria found on the surface of phones can aggravate the skin, and add to acne breakouts.

So be sure to keep your phone a good wipe, now and again.

Damaging your hearing

‘Playing music through headphones too loud can cause noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), which can make it difficult to hear speech, especially when there’s background noise,’  Dolores Madden from Hidden Hearing commented.

Solution: Always keep sound levels as low as you can and don’t listen for too long.

If you’re worried about you or your hearing contact your local Hidden Hearing branch.  Hidden Hearing offers free hearing tests at its 60 branches nationwide. To book a test Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit http://www.hiddenhearing.ie.

We have a handy information booklet on how we hear if you are interested apply below and we will send you a FREE copy.howdowehear2

How does our brain compensate for hearing loss?

sensorineural hearing loss is caused by abnormalities in the hair cells

sensorineural hearing loss is caused by abnormalities in the hair cells

The brain can do some amazing things and recent research into the effects of intermittent hearing loss has highlighted its impressive powers of adaptability, as well as the mechanisms it uses to locate sound.

Tracey Pollard from our Biomedical Research team tells us more about the research, carried out at Oxford University, and how it could lead to new approaches to treating persistent glue ear, whilst also having implications for hearing aid design.

Plasticity

The neurons, or nerve cells, in the brain are remarkable – they can change what they do depending on the information they receive from the outside world via the senses. This ability is known as plasticity – it means that the function of a neuron is not necessarily hardwired into it but can change depending on circumstances.

An example of this plasticity can be seen in deaf individuals, where the neurons that would normally be involved in processing signals and sounds from the ears are ‘diverted’ to the visual system. Here, they become involved in processing information from the eyes – so deaf people really do see more! This plasticity doesn’t just occur between sensory systems though; it can happen within one system. For example, if sound coming into the ears is distorted or degraded, the auditory nerves can adapt to make the best of the information they do have. This might happen when there is a lot of echo, or because sound is missing to some degree, as in partial deafness or deafness in one ear.

This adaptation isn’t always helpful, particularly if it’s persistent, as it may become permanent. In adults who receive a cochlear implant after being deaf for a long time, the neurons that have been diverted to other systems may no longer be available for the implant to stimulate which can make the implant less effective. Also, children who suffer from prolonged deafness in one ear during childhood can develop a ‘lazy ear’ when their hearing is subsequently restored (e.g. through surgery) – the brain is now too used to only receiving useful information from the unaffected ear. As a result, even though the brain is now getting information from both ears, it isn’t taking as much notice of the second ear as it should. This can cause problems later on, such as difficulties in picking out one particular sound from a noisy environment or locating where a sound is coming from.

Locating sound

The brain usually works out where a particular sound is coming from by combining the information it receives from both ears and using the differences between them to localise the sound. These differences are mostly ones of time (a sound from one side of a person will reach the ear on that side ever so slightly sooner than it reaches the ear on the other side) and volume (the sound will be ever so slightly louder in the ear on the side that it’s coming from than the ear on the other side). It also uses the information received from the external part of the ear (the pinna), which filters sounds coming from different directions in a particular way, to fine-tune the process.

However, if one ear is blocked e.g. by a persistent ear infection, or if a person is deaf in one ear only, the brain can still localise sounds by putting much more emphasis on the information from the unblocked ear. It can’t compare information between the ears, so instead it focuses more on the information from the pinna of the unaffected ear. This allows the brain to continue to localise sounds – it’s not quite as effective, but it’s good enough. However, as mentioned above, this strategy for localising sound may become hard-wired into the brain, so even if the hearing loss is corrected at a later time, the brain can’t go back to the old way of doing things, leading to the ‘lazy ear’ described above. This is a potential problem, as a significant number of children suffer from recurrent bouts of glue ear and thus lose their hearing in one ear until the infection is cleared. These children could therefore be at risk of developing more serious hearing problems later in life.

Glue ear and intermittent hearing loss

The hearing loss experienced in glue ear is not usually persistent – even in recurrent glue ear, once the infection is cleared, hearing in that ear returns to normal, at least until the next infection strikes! It might be that this intermittent hearing loss has a different effect upon the brain, and that’s exactly what Professor Andrew King and his team at Oxford University investigated. They modelled this intermittent hearing loss by plugging the ears of young ferrets and measuring how well they could localise sounds and what was happening in their brains whilst they were doing so. These ear plugs were routinely changed, meaning that the ferrets experienced occasional short bursts of normal ‘two-eared’ hearing. The researchers found that when one ear was plugged, the ferrets became dependent on the information from the unaffected ear for locating where sounds were coming from – they became very good at using this alternative strategy. However, when the ear was then unplugged, they immediately reverted to combining the information from both ears to locate sounds.

The neurons involved could adapt to the context i.e. whether information was coming from one ear or two and switched between the two strategies as appropriate. This meant that one process did not become hardwired over the other, and the ferrets could use whichever one was best for their situation; this is different to what happens when deafness is persistent with no periodic experience of normal hearing.

These findings could lead to new ways of rehabilitating children with glue ear that is serious enough to cause more permanent deafness – it suggests that every attempt should be made to restore their normal hearing whenever possible, so that they are less likely to develop more serious hearing problems later in life. The realisation that the information from the pinna is so important in this alternative strategy for locating sounds could have implications for the design of hearing aids.

If you’re worried about you or your hearing contact your local Hidden Hearing branch.  Hidden Hearing offers free hearing tests at its 60 branches nationwide. To book a test Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit http://www.hiddenhearing.ie.

Read More: From Action on Hearing Loss. Click Here.

We have a handy information booklet on how we hear if you are interested apply below and we will send you a FREE copy.howdowehear2

Can Super-Fast Hand Dryers Damage Your Hearing?

If you are reading this, then you probably suspect what the answer may be. Sadly, your suspicions would seem to be correct – it would seem that yes, the relatively new “super-fast” hand dryers can indeed negatively impact your hearing.

A recent study has suggested that the new models of hand dryers can have a fairly severe effect – they can have the same impact on your hearing as a pneumatic drill at close range would.

How Have They Passed Safety Testing?
It would seem as though they have successfully got through the typical barrage of safety tests simply via inaccuracies in the testing conditions – the product testing labs are significantly larger than your typical public toilet, and as such the final results were almost irrelevant.

Various researchers from Goldsmiths, University of London carried out this study, testing the acoustics in a lab of a “box shape” typical of public toilets. The results of this new study carried some startling findings: the noise levels recorded were eleven times as high as the ones reported by the product testing labs!

The head of the Goldsmiths sound practice research unit, Dr John Levack Drever, claimed that the difference in results was down to the “ultra-absorbent” acoustic lab environments, and how greatly they affect the noise in comparison to the real-life outcome in a public toilet. This latter environment would see the noise being “vastly amplified” due to the “highly reverberant and reflective” surroundings.

What Can Be Done to Correct This?
Dr Levack seems to think that the answer is simple: ditch the laboratories. To get a more realistic approach – one that is applicable to a real world scenario – they need to conduct their tests in a more realistic environment.

Levack states that users need to come together with engineers and sound artists in order to “tune the products accordingly”, so that they make less noise in the typical hand dryer locations.

What Is So Bad About Loud Noises?
Apart from the obvious things like deafness, the noise levels given out by these hand dryers cause some other negative effects.

Some of these effects are less apparent because they affect minorities instead of the population as a whole. For example, elderly sufferers of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease can suffer from discomfort and confusion caused by the noise, whilst people who are blind or have impaired vision can experience greater difficulty in navigation. Because the noise can reach such overwhelmingly loud levels, users of hearing aids are sometimes forced to turn off their devices whilst using a public toilet.

And of course, prolonged exposure to loud noises can lead to a degradation in the ability to hear.

The Effects of Hearing Loss
The effects of hearing loss are legion, and they are varied. A recent study has linked people who are hard of hearing with an increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, and other effects can include a feeling of isolation, depression, decreased enjoyment in social activities and a lack of awareness. The latter problem can be particularly serious in potentially dangerous situations, such as crossing the road.

Of course, the worst thing about losing your hearing is the obvious one – you can no longer hear. No one wants to go deaf. Try and limit your usage of super-fast hand dryers if you can.

With over 25 years’ experience in hearing healthcare, Hidden Hearing is committed to providing the most professional hearing healthcare service to its customers. Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit www.hiddenhearing.ie.

How your MOBILE can give you hearing loss … not to mention a saggy jaw and acne.

 

 

According to Which? the average handset has more germs than a toilet

More than a third of us own a smartphone and, on average, will look at it a barely believable 150 times a day

But have you ever considered what this is doing to your health? Here, we reveal how our favourite gadget can damage our bodies.

DAMAGING YOUR HEARING

Playing music through headphones too loud can cause noise-induced hearing loss, which can make it difficult to hear speech, especially when there’s background noise, many standard-issue headphones don’t fit the ear properly resulting in a leakage of sound, so we feel we have to turn up the volume. 

The solution: Bespoke headphones, but even then, always keep sound levels as low as you can and don’t listen for too long. Hidden Hearing  recommend the 60/60 Rule to protect your hearing – that’s listen to your personal music device through headphones for a maximum of 60 minutes at 60% of the volume

RUINING YOUR EYES

If your eyes feel sore after staring at your phone, you won’t be surprised to learn that focusing on a small object for a long time can cause dry eyes, which can lead to inflammation and infection. 

Even more worryingly, phones could be affecting children’s eyesight in the long-term. Mr Allon Barsam, a consultant opthalmic surgeon at Luton & Dunstable University Hospital, says it is possible that youngsters who stare at screens all day could be near-sighted as they grow up.

‘People only notice this when they can’t read a newspaper, but we tend to hold phones far closer to our eyes than papers — around 10in away as opposed to 16in — so it’s becoming a problem sooner. While smartphones aren’t necessarily damaging our  eyes, they are demanding more  of them.

The solution: Enlarge the size of the text on your phone, and to avoid glare, try to use your phone in a well-lit room and don’t use it for more than 15 minutes at a time.  

SQUASHING THE SPINE

Our smartphones are changing our posture. ‘Our bodies are a product of what we do on a daily basis,’ says Kirsten Lord, a chartered physiotherapist.

‘I now see far more people with pain in their neck or shoulders. We tend to poke our heads forward when we’re reading something on a phone or tablet. This position squashes the top of your spine and compresses the nerves that go up to your head. The result can be headaches and feeling tired and stiff.’

The solution: Invest in a hands-free kit. Kirsten also advises trying exercises to lengthen your neck muscles, such as imagining a string pulling you up from the middle of your head to help you improve your posture.

GIVING YOU SAGGY JOWLS

Excessive phone use could change the definition of your jawline. ‘I’ve seen an increase in the number of women in their 30s concerned about weakness in the lower third of their face,’ says cosmetic dermatologist, Dr Sam Bunting. 

‘As we age, our skin’s elasticity decreases and it’s feasible that bending our neck forward for hours on end to look at smartphones and tablets may mean there is more of a downwards tug on the delicate skin.’

The solution: Try holding your phone or tablet straight out in front of you, rather than below chest level, so you’re not constantly looking downwards.

CAUSING SPOTS

Considering how hot phone screens get after a long call, it’s no surprise that some experts are concerned they can give you pimples or sweat rash. 

Which? magazine carried out tests on a sample of 30 mobile phones and discovered that, on average, a handset had 18 times more harmful germs on it than the flush handle in a men’s lavatory.

The solution: If you’re prone to spots, use a hands-free kit and wipe your phone with a saline solution. 

STOPPING YOU SLEEPING

Computers, laptops, tablets and phones tend to give off a blue light, thought to interfere with the natural hormones, such as melatonin, which help us  to sleep. 

The solution: Research from the Mayo Clinic in Arizona suggests that dimming the brightness settings on your phone and holding it at least 14in from your face while using it will reduce its potential to impede sleep. Better yet, buy an old-fashioned alarm clock and leave your phone outside your bedroom at night. 

RUINING RELATIONSHIPS

We might think our phones facilitate communication, but studies suggest otherwise. ‘Technology can make it hard to manage boundaries in our lives,’ says Dr Emma Short, a psychologist at the University of Bedfordshire.

‘So if we’re on our phone, we don’t give our full attention to those we’re physically with. Research also suggests the more engaged we are in social networks, such as Facebook and Twitter, the more lonely we can become as family, friends and work relationships suffer.’

The solution: Have a strict rule that there are no phones at  the dinner table or when you’re out socially.

With over 25 years’ experience in hearing healthcare, Hidden Hearing is committed to providing the most professional hearing healthcare service to its customers. Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit www.hiddenhearing.ie.