Win Tickets to see Richard Clayderman in concert

ImageThe INEC in Killarney have very kindly given us three pairs of tickets to see Richard Clayderman playing at the INEC on Saturday 20th April 2013. Over the course of his 30 year career, Richard Clayderman has performed over 1,900 concerts worldwide, has recorded more than 1,200 titles and has sold more than 85 MILLION albums! As a German journalist once described Richard’s achievements “ he has arguably done more to popularize the piano around the world than anyone since Beethoven.”

So how can you be in with a chance to win tickets to this unmissable show? Simple, just apply here for one of our free hearing information packs. Free information packs are for anyone that is concerned about their hearing and the pack contains a free comprehensive guide for anyone interested in better hearing.

Hidden Hearing responds to new website to assist those learning Irish Sign Language

RTEmagicC_Sign_Language__2_.jpgGood news for those learning Irish Sign Language (ISL) with the launch of a new mobile website aimed at teaching the language. The system,ISL Everywhere’, is designed to help children expand their vocabulary and improve their communication skills.

The website is free of charge and is suitable for smartphones, allowing parents to easily gain access to the words they need to carry out everyday tasks with their children. It includes more than 1,000 signs and phrases that concentrate on the everyday vocabulary used by young children and in daily routines such as bedtime, visits to the doctor and special occasions including birthdays and Christmas.

The Irish Times writes that “the resource was the brainchild of the Sharing the Journey volunteer organisation, an independent parent-to-parent group that was set up to support parents of deaf and hard of hearing children, in collaboration with the Irish Deaf Society and the Centre for Deaf Studies, Trinity College Dublin.”

WebElevate, a digital technology, content and game development programme for graduate jobseekers, became involved when Sharing the Journey was looking for help in developing the resource. Co-founder of the support group Teresa McDonnell said the website would expand opportunities for deaf and hard of hearing children to become more involved with the world around them.

“For most families their deaf baby is the first deaf person that they have ever met. Learning ISL can be challenging not only for parents, but for siblings and relatives as well,” said Ms McDonnell.

“ISL Everywhere will be a fantastic support for everyone learning ISL. Families, neighbours, pre-school teachers and other significant people in a child’s life can now access good quality, accurate signs when and where they need them.”

Discussing ISL, John Mangan, CEO of the Irish Deaf Society said: “Irish Sign Language is a unique language, native to Ireland and is not just about the movements of the hands but also involves body movement, facial expressions and using the space around you to convey what you are saying. ISL Everywhere is an excellent resource and I look forward to seeing it grow from strength to strength.”

The mobile website http://sharingthejourney.ie/mobile/ includes:

  • Over 1,000 signs and phrases, focusing on the everyday vocabulary of a young child’s life
  • A word association feature
  • Vocabulary needed for daily routines (eg bedtime and bath-time, doctor’s appointment)
  • Bedtime stories
  • Printable resource materials
  • Rainy day activities

Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit www.hiddenhearing.ie.

Celebrities with hearing loss: Part 2

Health issues affect all sectors of society, whether you’re a regular Joe Public or a celebrity. Hearing loss is no different and there are many well- known people who are/were deaf and have hearing impairments. We looked at a few in Part 1, now we take a look at some more of them.

BeethovenLudwig Van Beethoven – Beethoven was as we know a great source of confidence for himself and for others, being able to create music and play music even after being completely deaf is by itself quite a miracle. Although it was clear to everyone that beethoven was but a man, he conquered his disability and led himself to being one of the greatest musicians of all time. If there was one thing that was affecting his struggle to succeed it was not only being deaf, but having to fight all the emotions that he felt inside when he had to turn around to look at the audience applause because he could not hear.

Johnnie Ray – John Alvin Ray (January 10, 1927-February 24, 1990) was an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. Ray developed a unique rhythm based style, described as alternating between pre-rock R&B and a more conventional classic pop approach. He was partially deaf because of an injury sustained at the age of 13. He became deaf in his right ear at age 13 after an accident during a Boy Scout event. He later performed his music wearing a hearing aid. Surgery performed in New York in 1958, left him almost completely deaf in both ears, although hearing aids helped his condition.

Lou Ferrigno – Louis Jude “Lou” Ferrigno (Nov. 9, 1951), best known as the original ‘incredible hulk’,  is an American actor, fitness trainer and consultant, and retired professional bodybuilder. Soon after he was born, Ferrigno says he believes he suffered a series of ear infections and lost 75 to 80% of his hearing, though his condition was not diagnosed until he was three years old. Ferrigno says his hearing loss hasn’t held him back in his career. “I think that if I wasn’t hard of hearing I wouldn’t be where I am now. It takes time to overcome a handicap. There are ups and downs and you can never be a quitter. I believe the maxim that you only get out of life what you put into it”.

Official_Portrait_of_President_Reagan_1981Ronald Reagan – US President 1981 – 1989) Ronald Reagan used a hearing aid in his right ear early in his term, but later also started wearing one in his left ear. It was speculated that his hearing was damaged during his early years as a Hollywood actor, when he was exposed to loud gunshot noises during the filming of Western movies.

 Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit www.hiddenhearing.ie.

Celebrities with hearing loss: Part 1

Health issues affect all sectors of society, whether you’re a regular Joe Public or a celebrity. Hearing loss is no different and there are many well- known people who are/were deaf and have hearing impairments. Today we thought we’d take a look at some of them.

UnknownPete Townshend – an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer, Pete Townshend blames his hearing loss on a lifetime spent using headphones, experts say today’s iPod Generation is storing up trouble for the future by listening to music at high volumes.

image.ashxHelen Keller – (1880 – 1968) – Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) – an American author, activist and lecturer. She was the first deaf/blind person to graduate from college. She was not born blind and deaf; it was not until nineteen months of age that she came down with an illness described by doctors as “an acute congestion of the stomach and the brain”, which could have possibly been scarlet fever or meningitis. The illness did not last for a particularly long time, but it left her deaf and blind. Keller went on to become a world-famous speaker and author. She is remembered as an advocate for people with disabilities amid numerous other causes.

edison2Thomas Edison – Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor of Dutch origin and businessman who developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph and a long lasting light bulb. In school, the young Edison’s mind often wandered. He was noted to be terrible at mathematics, unable to focus, and had difficulty with words and speech. This ended Edison’s three months of official schooling. The cause of Edison’s deafness has been attributed to a bout of scarlet fever during childhood and recurring untreated middle ear infections

 

Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit www.hiddenhearing.ie.

Hidden Hearing on article “Hearing Loss Linked to Dementia”

Age-related hearing loss starts messing with the volume

Age-related hearing loss starts messing with the volume

We were sent a link to an article in The New York Times, “Straining to Hear and Fend off Dementia,” written in Feb  by Katherine Bouton, a former Times editor. In her article, Bouton described a personal experience that many have often encountered. Many times, we have been at a party or meeting and tried to have a conversation with an individual. We strain and stretch, eager to hear above the din of surrounding conversations, then we forget what we were trying to say and forget our friend’s name. We are defeated by our ears.

Social isolation increases our risk of dementia. It can happen anytime, any place. When it does, it threatens our sense of well-being and stability. Recently, a friend complained about difficulties she experienced carrying on a conversation. She wondered why she had joined the celebration. She felt alone, distanced from everyone in the midst of the crowd. Isolation in the middle of a party is a scary place to be. Hearing aids may work during a quiet conversation, one on one, but frequently fail in a group setting.

Dr. Frank Lin from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine describes this experience as “cognitive load.”

“Essentially, the brain is so preoccupied with translating the sounds into words that it seems to have no processing power left to search through the storerooms of memory for a response.”

Dolores Madden from Hidden Hearing explains  – “Our heads are working so hard to catch the conversation, we cannot respond appropriately. In a long-term study in 2011, Dr. Lin from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine found that people with mild hearing loss had a greater risk of dementia than people with normal hearing.

Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit www.hiddenhearing.ie.

360 million people in the world have disabling hearing loss

More than 360 million people have disabling hearing loss, according to new global estimates released by the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO), which adds that production of hearing aids is not keeping up with the urgent demand.

“Current production of hearing aids meets less than 10 per cent of global need,” WHO’s Shelly Chadha of the Department of Prevention of Blindness and Deafness said in a news release issued ahead of International Ear Care Day. Marked annually in March, the Day aims to raise awareness and promotes community-based activities for ear and hearing health.

As the population ages globally, more people than ever before face hearing loss. One in every three people over the age of 65 – a total of 165 million people worldwide – lives with hearing loss, according to WHO.

Another 32 million people affected by hearing lossAHAP-1 World_400 are children under the age of 15. Many of whom live in low- and middle-income countries – particularly in South Asia, Asia and the Pacific and sub-Saharan Africa – where untreated ear infections lead to hearing loss.

“About half of all cases of hearing loss are easily preventable while many can be treated through early diagnosis and suitable interventions such as surgically-implanted hearing devices,” Ms. Chadha said.

WHO encourages countries to develop programmes for preventing hearing loss within their primary health care systems, including vaccinating children against measles, meningitis, mumps and rubella; screening and treating syphilis in pregnant women; and early assessment and management of hearing loss in babies.

According to the figures released today, fewer than one out of 40 people who need a hearing aid in developing countries have one. WHO said it is exploring technology transfer as a way to promote access to hearing aids in those places.

The agency also cited sign language training and social support as beneficial for people with disabling hearing loss.

Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit www.hiddenhearing.ie.

Hearing Awareness Week 2013

374558_10151405695513612_133433062_n 599108_10151405694673612_2011913724_n 482169_10151405694173612_296173532_nHearing Awareness Week is winding down after what has been the busiest campaign in its seven year history. This year’s initiative kicked off with a launch event in the Red Cow Hotel, with almost 600 Age Action members celebrating the launch with a Dickie Rock concert.

On Tuesday, the Northern Ireland campaign commenced, launched by ITV Daybreak GP, Dr Hilary Jones, who conducted a number of high profile media interviews to promote the hearing healthcare message. On the same day, Hidden Hearing officially opened a state-of-the-art hearing healthcare centre in Ennis, with a huge number of supporters turning out to celebrate the occasion. TV presenter and health journalist, Dr Nina Byrnes cut the ribbon on the day.

Wednesday was the turn of Cork, where Hearing Awareness Week was celebrated with a concert by Eurovision singer, David O’ Connor and Cork showband legend, Declan Ryan. The message of the campaign is that hearing loss shouldn’t stop you having a good time.

The Irish Deaf Society has been very active throughout Hearing Awareness Week, providing a number of Deaf Awareness Training sessions with schools and colleges. Fun and interactive, the  aim of the training is to provide knowledge and strategies for improving the interaction between Deaf and hearing people through challenging attitudes, promoting deaf inclusion, reducing discrimination and improving access and equality for Deaf people.

And throughout Hearing Awareness Week the Mobile Hearing Clinic travelled the country providing free hearing screenings.

Anybody who might be concerned about their hearing, can avail of a free hearing test at any Hidden Hearing branch nationwide. You can book a hearing test free of charge at any of Hidden Hearing’s 60 clinics nationwide. Freephone 1800 370 000 or visit www.hiddenhearing.ie.